Yorùbá Influences on Haitian Vodou and New Orleans Voodoo

@article{Fandrich2007YorbIO,
  title={Yor{\`u}b{\'a} Influences on Haitian Vodou and New Orleans Voodoo},
  author={Ina J. Fandrich},
  journal={Journal of Black Studies},
  year={2007},
  volume={37},
  pages={775 - 791}
}
  • Ina J. Fandrich
  • Published 9 March 2007
  • Political Science, History
  • Journal of Black Studies
The enormous impact of the Yorùbá religion on the New World African diaspora has been well established by scholars, especially when referring to the heavily Yorùbánized popular Creole belief systems of Cuba (Santería/ Lucumí, Palo) and Brazil (Umbanda, Candomblé). Far less known are the connections between the Yorùbá faith and the African-based religions of Haiti (Vodou ) and New Orleans (Voodoo/Voudou). This article seeks to fill these lacunae and explores the Yorùbá influences on these two… 
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