Yellow-headed Caracara and Black Vulture Cleaning Baird's Tapir

@article{Coulson2018YellowheadedCA,
  title={Yellow-headed Caracara and Black Vulture Cleaning Baird's Tapir},
  author={Jennifer O. Coulson and Emmanuel Rondeau and Manuel Caravaca},
  journal={Journal of Raptor Research},
  year={2018},
  volume={52},
  pages={104 - 107}
}
In a cleaning symbiosis, one animal species, the cleaner, removes and consumes ectoparasites, necrotic tissue, or mucus from another animal species, the client or host. The only raptors reported as cleaners are of the orders Cathartiformes (Black Vulture [Coragyps atratus]) and Falconiformes (Southern Caracara [Caracara plancus]; Striated Caracara [Phalcoboenus australis]; Black Caracara [Daptrius ater]; Yellow-headed Caracara [Milvago chimachima]; Chimango Caracara [M. chimango]; Sazima 2011… 

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It is found that 33 bird species in 16 families practice cleaning even if some of them do so very occasionally, and some clients adopt particular inviting postures while being cleaned, whereas others are indifferent or even disturbed by the activity of cleaner birds.

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Black Vultures (Coragyps atratus) pick organic debris from the hair of a domestic dog in southeastern Brazil

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