Yellow Fever in Angola and Beyond--The Problem of Vaccine Supply and Demand.

@article{Barrett2016YellowFI,
  title={Yellow Fever in Angola and Beyond--The Problem of Vaccine Supply and Demand.},
  author={Alan D. T. Barrett},
  journal={The New England journal of medicine},
  year={2016},
  volume={375 4},
  pages={
          301-3
        }
}
  • A. Barrett
  • Published 8 June 2016
  • Medicine
  • The New England journal of medicine
A resurgence of yellow fever disease in multiple African countries has proved difficult to control. Given that we have a highly effective vaccine that confers lifelong immunity, why is yellow fever still a problem? Much of the answer lies in vaccine supply and demand. 
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References

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Yellow Fever in Africa: Estimating the Burden of Disease and Impact of Mass Vaccination from Outbreak and Serological Data
TLDR
The disease burden of yellow fever in Africa, as well as the impact of mass vaccination campaigns, is estimated by Neil Ferguson and colleagues and the number of vaccinated people in sub-Saharan Africa is estimated to be 1.3 million.
Yellow fever: a disease that has yet to be conquered.
TLDR
Molecular epidemiologic data suggest there are seven genotypes of YFV that are geographically separated, and outbreaks of disease are more associated with particular genotypes, which present serious potential public health problems to large population centers.
Subdoses of 17DD yellow fever vaccine elicit equivalent virological/immunological kinetics timeline
TLDR
Analysis of serum biomarkers IFN-γ and IL-10, in association to PRNT and viremia, support the recommendation of use of a ten-fold lower subdose (3,013 IU) of 17DD-YF vaccine.
Intradermally Administered Yellow Fever Vaccine at Reduced Dose Induces a Protective Immune Response: A Randomized Controlled Non-Inferiority Trial
TLDR
Intradermal administration of one fifth of the amount of yellow fever vaccine administered subcutaneously results in protective seroimmunity in all volunteers, and should be confirmed in field studies in areas with potential yellow fever virus transmission to change vaccination policy.
Meeting of the Emergency Committee under the International Health Regulations ( 2005 ) concerning yellow fever