YOUNG SOLAR SYSTEM's FIFTH GIANT PLANET?

@article{Nesvorn2011YOUNGSS,
  title={YOUNG SOLAR SYSTEM's FIFTH GIANT PLANET?},
  author={David Nesvorn{\'y}},
  journal={The Astrophysical Journal Letters},
  year={2011},
  volume={742}
}
  • D. Nesvorný
  • Published 13 September 2011
  • Physics, Geology
  • The Astrophysical Journal Letters
Studies of solar system formation suggest that the solar system's giant planets formed and migrated in the protoplanetary disk to reach the resonant orbits with all planets inside ∼15 AU from the Sun. After the gas disk's dispersal, Uranus and Neptune were likely scattered by the gas giants, and approached their current orbits while dispersing the transplanetary disk of planetesimals, whose remains survived to this time in the region known as the Kuiper Belt. Here we performed N-body… 

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