Y chromosomes of prehistoric people along the Yangtze River

@article{Li2007YCO,
  title={Y chromosomes of prehistoric people along the Yangtze River},
  author={Hui Li and Ying Huang and Laura F. Mustavich and Fan Zhang and Jingze Tan and Ling-E Wang and Ji Qian and Meng-He Gao and Li Jin},
  journal={Human Genetics},
  year={2007},
  volume={122},
  pages={383-388}
}
The ability to extract mitochondrial and nuclear DNA from ancient remains has enabled the study of ancient DNA, a legitimate field for over 20 years now. Recently, Y chromosome genotyping has begun to be applied to ancient DNA. The Y chromosome haplogroup in East Asia has since caught the attention of molecular anthropologists, as it is one of the most ethnic-related genetic markers of the region. In this paper, the Y chromosome haplogroup of DNA from ancient East Asians was examined, in order… 
Y Chromosome analysis of prehistoric human populations in the West Liao River Valley, Northeast China
TLDR
The results suggest that the prehistoric cultural transitions were associated with immigration from the Yellow River valley and the northern steppe into the West Liao River valley, with a concurrent increase in lineage diversity caused by an influx of immigrants from other populations.
Genetic characteristics and migration history of a bronze culture population in the West Liao-River valley revealed by ancient DNA
TLDR
Climate change is an important factor, which drove the population migration during the Bronze Age in northern China, and the local genetic continuity did not seem to be affected by outward migration, although more data are needed especially from other ancient populations to determine the influence of return migration on genetic continuity.
Genetic diversity of two Neolithic populations provides evidence of farming expansions in North China
TLDR
To understand the Neolithic farming expansions between the West Liao River Valley and the Yellow River Valley, mitochondrial DNA and the Y chromosome of 48 individuals from two archeological sites, Jiangjialiang and Sanguan, are analyzed.
Genetic affinity between the Hmong-Mien and Mon-Khmer populations
TLDR
The Y chromosome data of 1652 individuals from 47 populations of Mon-Khmer and Hmong-Mien ethnic groups are presented, which are the aborigines of Southeast Asia and extending area in East Asia.
Revisiting the male genetic landscape of China: a multi-center study of almost 38,000 Y-STR haplotypes
TLDR
A continuous genetic North–South gradient in the Han is observed, confirming previous reports of a clinal distribution of Y chromosome variation and being in notable concordance with the previously observed spatial distribution of autosomal variation.
Ancient DNA Reveals That the Genetic Structure of the Northern Han Chinese Was Shaped Prior to 3,000 Years Ago
TLDR
The results show that the ancient people of Hengbei bore a strong genetic resemblance to present-day northern Han Chinese and were genetically distinct from other present- day Chinese populations and two ancient populations.
Origin of ethnic groups, linguistic families, and civilizations in China viewed from the Y chromosome.
TLDR
Geneticists confirm the recent African origin of modern East Asians, and observe the process of shaping the genetic structure of East Asians may help in understanding the global natural history of modern humans.
Genetic origin of Kadai-speaking Gelong people on Hainan island viewed from Y chromosomes
TLDR
It is suggested that the Gelong people on Hainan Island register as Gelao for their official ethnicity, however, this identification is invalid until it is accepted by theGelong people themselves and the Hainsan government.
Low Mitochondrial DNA Diversity in an Ancient Population from China: Insight into Social Organization at the Fujia Site
TLDR
The authors' results reveal a low mitochondrial DNA diversity from the site and population and suggest that the bond of marriage was de-emphasized compared with the bonds of descent at Fujia.
...
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 33 REFERENCES
A preliminary analysis of the DNA and diet of the extinct Beothuk: a systematic approach to ancient human DNA.
TLDR
Both mtDNA sequence data and Y SNP data hint at possible gene flow or a common ancestral population for both the Beothuk and the current day Mikmaq, but more importantly the data do not lend credence to the proposed idea that the Beothsuk were of admixed (European-Native American) descent.
Ancient HLA genes from 7,500-year-old archaeological remains
TLDR
Using DNA obtained from one individual, distinctive patterns of nucleotide substitution in the cloned heavy chain gene segments permit tentative assignment of the HLA-A,B type of the ancient individual.
Nuclear and mitochondrial DNA analysis of a 2,000-year-old necropolis in the Egyin Gol Valley of Mongolia.
TLDR
This is the first study using biparental, paternal, and maternal genetic systems to reconstruct partial genealogies in a protohistoric necropolis and showed close relationships between several specimens.
Ancient DNA analysis of human neolithic remains found in northeastern Siberia.
TLDR
DNA extracted from a bone sample of a Neolithic skeleton excavated in northeastern Yakutia showed the affinity of this ancient skeleton with both east Siberian/Asian and Native American populations.
Y-chromosome evidence of southern origin of the East Asian-specific haplogroup O3-M122.
TLDR
It is estimated that the early northward migration of the O3-M122 lineages in East Asia occurred approximately 25,000-30,000 years ago, consistent with the fossil records of modern humans in EastAsia.
Genetic analyses from ancient DNA.
TLDR
The precautions and criteria necessary to ascertain to the greatest extent possible that results represent authentic ancient DNA sequences are discussed, which highlight some significant results and areas of promising future research.
Genetic studies of human diversity in East Asia
TLDR
With the confirmation of an African origin for East Asian populations and the observation of a dominating impact of the gene flow entering East Asia from the south in early human settlement, interpretation of the north–south division poses the challenge to the field.
No Evidence of Neandertal mtDNA Contribution to Early Modern Humans
TLDR
The biomolecular preservation of four Neandertals and of five early modern humans was good enough to suggest the preservation of DNA, and in combination with current mtDNA data, this excludes any large genetic contribution by Ne andertals to early modern human humans, but does not rule out the possibility of a smaller contribution.
Human beta-globin gene polymorphisms characterized in DNA extracted from ancient bones 12,000 years old.
TLDR
The successful extraction and amplification of nuclear DNA from the beta-globin region from 5 of 10 bone specimens up to 12,000 years old shows that the systematic study of nuclearDNA polymorphisms of ancient populations is feasible.
Molecular cloning of Ancient Egyptian mummy DNA
TLDR
Analysis of 23 mummies investigated for DNA content show that substantial pieces of mummy DNA can be cloned and that the DNA fragments seem to contain little or no modifications introduced postmortem.
...
...