Y-chromosome variation and Irish origins

@article{Hill2000YchromosomeVA,
  title={Y-chromosome variation and Irish origins},
  author={Emmeline W. Hill and Mark A. Jobling and Daniel G. Bradley},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2000},
  volume={404},
  pages={351-352}
}
Ireland's position on the western edge of Europe suggests that the genetics of its population should have been relatively undisturbed by the demographic movements that have shaped variation on the mainland. We have typed 221 Y chromosomes from Irish males for seven (slowly evolving) biallelic and six (quickly evolving) simple tandem-repeat markers. When these samples are partitioned by surname, we find significant differences in genetic frequency between those of Irish Gaelic and of foreign… Expand
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