Y-chromosome variation among Sudanese: restricted gene flow, concordance with language, geography, and history.

@article{Hassan2008YchromosomeVA,
  title={Y-chromosome variation among Sudanese: restricted gene flow, concordance with language, geography, and history.},
  author={Hisham Y Hassan and Peter A. Underhill and Luca L. Cavalli-Sforza and Muntaser Eltayeb Ibrahim},
  journal={American journal of physical anthropology},
  year={2008},
  volume={137 3},
  pages={
          316-23
        }
}
We study the major levels of Y-chromosome haplogroup variation in 15 Sudanese populations by typing major Y-haplogroups in 445 unrelated males representing the three linguistic families in Sudan. [...] Key Result Our analysis shows Sudanese populations fall into haplogroups A, B, E, F, I, J, K, and R in frequencies of 16.9, 7.9, 34.4, 3.1, 1.3, 22.5, 0.9, and 13% respectively.Expand
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Paternal lineages in Libya inferred from Y-chromosome haplogroups.
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Chadic languages and Y haplogroups
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