Y-chromosome evidence for differing ancient demographic histories in the Americas.

@article{Bortolini2003YchromosomeEF,
  title={Y-chromosome evidence for differing ancient demographic histories in the Americas.},
  author={Maria C{\'a}tira Bortolini and Francisco Mauro Salzano and Mark George Thomas and Steven Stuart and Selja P K Nasanen and Claiton H.D. Bau and Mara Helena Hutz and Zulay Layrisse and Maria Luiza Petzl-Erler and Luiza Tamie Tsuneto and K R Hill and Ana Magdalena Hurtado and Dinorah C. Castro-de-Guerra and Mar{\'i}a Mercedes Torres and Helena Groot and Roman Michalski and Pagbajabyn Nymadawa and Gabriel Bedoya and Neil Bradman and Damian Labuda and Andres Ruiz-Linares},
  journal={American journal of human genetics},
  year={2003},
  volume={73 3},
  pages={
          524-39
        }
}
To scrutinize the male ancestry of extant Native American populations, we examined eight biallelic and six microsatellite polymorphisms from the nonrecombining portion of the Y chromosome, in 438 individuals from 24 Native American populations (1 Na Dené and 23 South Amerinds) and in 404 Mongolians. One of the biallelic markers typed is a recently identified mutation (M242) characterizing a novel founder Native American haplogroup. The distribution, relatedness, and diversity of Y lineages in… Expand
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