Y chromosome evidence for Anglo-Saxon mass migration.

@article{Weale2002YCE,
  title={Y chromosome evidence for Anglo-Saxon mass migration.},
  author={Michael E. Weale and Deborah Weiss and Rolf F. Jager and Neil Bradman and Mark George Thomas},
  journal={Molecular biology and evolution},
  year={2002},
  volume={19 7},
  pages={
          1008-21
        }
}
British history contains several periods of major cultural change. It remains controversial as to how much these periods coincided with substantial immigration from continental Europe, even for those that occurred most recently. In this study, we examine genetic data for evidence of male immigration at particular times into Central England and North Wales. To do this, we used 12 biallelic polymorphisms and six microsatellite markers to define high-resolution Y chromosome haplotypes in a sample… 

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