Y-Chromosome Analysis in Individuals Bearing the Basarab Name of the First Dynasty of Wallachian Kings

@article{MartnezCruz2012YChromosomeAI,
  title={Y-Chromosome Analysis in Individuals Bearing the Basarab Name of the First Dynasty of Wallachian Kings},
  author={B. Mart{\'i}nez-Cruz and M. Ioana and F. Calafell and Lara R Arauna and P. Sanz and Ramona Ionescu and S. Boengiu and L. Kalaydjieva and H. Pamjav and H. Makukh and T. Plantinga and J. V. D. van der Meer and D. Comas and M. Netea},
  journal={PLoS ONE},
  year={2012},
  volume={7}
}
Vlad III The Impaler, also known as Dracula, descended from the dynasty of Basarab, the first rulers of independent Wallachia, in present Romania. Whether this dynasty is of Cuman (an admixed Turkic people that reached Wallachia from the East in the 11th century) or of local Romanian (Vlach) origin is debated among historians. Earlier studies have demonstrated the value of investigating the Y chromosome of men bearing a historical name, in order to identify their genetic origin. We sampled 29… Expand
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