Y‐chromosome Lineages from Portugal, Madeira and Açores Record Elements of Sephardim and Berber Ancestry

@article{Gonalves2005YchromosomeLF,
  title={Y‐chromosome Lineages from Portugal, Madeira and Açores Record Elements of Sephardim and Berber Ancestry},
  author={Rita Gonçalves and Ana Isabel Freitas and Marta Branco and Alexandra Rosa and Ana Teresa Fernandes and Lev A. Zhivotovsky and Peter A. Underhill and Toomas Kivisild and Ant{\'o}nio Brehm},
  journal={Annals of Human Genetics},
  year={2005},
  volume={69}
}
A total of 553 Y‐chromosomes were analyzed from mainland Portugal and the North Atlantic Archipelagos of Açores and Madeira, in order to characterize the genetic composition of their male gene pool. A large majority (78–83% of each population) of the male lineages could be classified as belonging to three basic Y chromosomal haplogroups, R1b, J, and E3b. While R1b, accounting for more than half of the lineages in any of the Portuguese sub‐populations, is a characteristic marker of many… Expand
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