Xenopus fraseri: Mr. Fraser, where did your frog come from?

@article{Evans2019XenopusFM,
  title={Xenopus fraseri: Mr. Fraser, where did your frog come from?},
  author={Ben J. Evans and Marie-Theres Gansauge and Edward L. Stanley and Benjamin L S Furman and Caroline M. S. Cauret and Caleb Ofori-Boateng and V{\'a}clav Gvo{\vz}d{\'i}k and Jeffrey W. Streicher and Eli Greenbaum and Richard C. Tinsley and Matthias Meyer and David C. Blackburn},
  journal={PLoS ONE},
  year={2019},
  volume={14}
}
A comprehensive, accurate, and revisable alpha taxonomy is crucial for biodiversity studies, but is challenging when data from reference specimens are difficult to collect or observe. However, recent technological advances can overcome some of these challenges. To illustrate this, we used modern approaches to tackle a centuries-old taxonomic enigma presented by Fraser’s Clawed Frog, Xenopus fraseri, including whether X. fraseri is different from other species, and if so, where it is situated… 

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