XXXVIII. An account of further discoveries in air. By the Rev. Joseph Priestley, LL.D. F.R.S. in letter to Sir John Pringle, Bart. P.R.S. and the Rev. Dr. Price, F.R.S

@article{PrieffieyXXXVIIIAA,
  title={XXXVIII. An account of further discoveries in air. By the Rev. Joseph Priestley, LL.D. F.R.S. in letter to Sir John Pringle, Bart. P.R.S. and the Rev. Dr. Price, F.R.S},
  author={Jofeph Prieffiey and LL.D. F. R. S. Lette and John Martin Douglas Pringle},
  journal={Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London},
  pages={384 - 394}
}
LETTER I. TO SIR JOHN PRINGLE, BART. P.R.S. Dear Sir, Having been pretty fortunate in the prosecution of my experiments on different kinds of air, since the publication of my treatise on that subject, I think it due to the attention with which you have from the first honoured them, to give you some account of what I have lately done. I know that every new discovery, in any branch of natural knowledge, gives you pleasure; and it is peculiarly flattering to me, that you consider some of those… 
4 Citations
Evolution of the Knowledge of Free Radicals and Other Oxidants
TLDR
Free radicals play a dual role in living systems: they are toxic by-products of aerobic metabolism, causing oxidative damage and tissue dysfunction, and serve as molecular signals activating beneficial stress responses.
Highs and lows of hyperoxia: physiological, performance, and clinical aspects.
TLDR
This review provides an overview of the evidence for and against the use of hyperoxia as an aid to enhance physical performance, and addresses pathophysiological concepts, clinical studies, and implications for therapy.
Lung and gut microbiota are altered by hyperoxia and contribute to oxygen-induced lung injury in mice
TLDR
It is reported that in both humans and mice, inhaled oxygen influenced respiratory bacterial communities and that these communities could contribute to lung injury.
Chalkogene: Elemente der sechsten Hauptgruppe