XVIII. Concerning the latitude and longitude of the Royal Observatory at Greenwich; with remarks on a memorial of the late M. Cassini de Thury

@article{MaskelyneXVIIICT,
  title={XVIII. Concerning the latitude and longitude of the Royal Observatory at Greenwich; with remarks on a memorial of the late M. Cassini de Thury},
  author={N. Maskelyne},
  journal={Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London},
  pages={151 - 187}
}
  • N. Maskelyne
  • Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London
The preceediing Memorial of the late M. Cassini de Thury was put into my hands by Sir Joseph Banks, our President, on the 28th April, 1785, desiring me at the same time to give an answer to it. Happy if I can solve the doubts entertained by the late Royal Astronomer of France concerning the latitude and longitude of this Royal Observatory, and at the same time do justice to the memories of my learned predecessors, and to myself, I shall give an account of the principal operations that have been… Expand
Tracing Ramsden's ‘Plumbline Level’
Doubts on the Accuracy of the English QuadrantsIn the eighteenth century the practice of astronomy in Europe was consolidated through the establishment of several institutional observatories' and theExpand
Linear Theory for Self-Localization: Convexity, Barycentric Coordinates, and Cayley–Menger Determinants
TLDR
This paper reviews a notable alternative to the nonlinear localization problem, i.e., a linear-convex method based on Khan et al.'s work, and discusses the solution under a structural convexity condition, namely, the sensors lie inside the convex hull of at least m+1 anchors. Expand
A novel geometric approach towards a linear theory for sensor localization
Localization, finding the coordinates of a point with respect to other points with known coordinates– referred to as anchors, is essentially a nonlinear problem, since, for example, it involvesExpand