XVI. Astronomical observations relating to the construction of the heavens, arranged for the purpose of a critical examination, the result of which appears to throw some new light upon the organization of the celestial bodies

@article{HerschelXVIAO,
  title={XVI. Astronomical observations relating to the construction of the heavens, arranged for the purpose of a critical examination, the result of which appears to throw some new light upon the organization of the celestial bodies},
  author={William Sir Herschel},
  journal={Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London},
  pages={269 - 336}
}
  • W. Herschel
  • Physics
  • Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London
Aknowledge of the construction of the heavens has always been the ultimate object of my observations, and having been many years engaged in applying my forty, twenty, and large ten feet telescopes, on account of their great space-penetrating power to review the most interesting objects discovered in my sweeps, as well as those which had before been communicated to the public in the Connoissance des Temps, for 1784, I find that by arranging these objects in a certain successive regular order… 

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