XI. On the mode of formation of the canal for containing the spinal marrow, and on the form of the fins (if they deserve that name) of the Proteosaurus

@article{HomeXIOT,
  title={XI. On the mode of formation of the canal for containing the spinal marrow, and on the form of the fins (if they deserve that name) of the Proteosaurus},
  author={Everard Home},
  journal={Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London},
  pages={159 - 164}
}
  • E. Home
  • History
  • Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London
The last communication respecting the bones of the Proteo saurus which I laid before the Royal Society, contained so many important facts connected with the skeleton, that there was no room left to hope, I should ever again call the attention of its members to this subject. Yet such has been the exertion made by some persons employed by Colonel Birch, to explore the cliffs at Lyme, in search of fossil organic remains, from an expectation that they will receive the full reward of their labours… 
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