X-ray illumination of the ejecta of supernova 1987A

@article{Larsson2011XrayIO,
  title={X-ray illumination of the ejecta of supernova 1987A},
  author={Josefin Larsson and Claes Fransson and G{\"o}ran {\"O}stlin and Per Gr{\"o}ningsson and Anders Jerkstrand and Cecilia Kozma and Jesper Sollerman and Peter M. Challis and Robert P. Kirshner and Roger A. Chevalier and Kevin Heng and Richard McCray and Nicholas B. Suntzeff and Patrice Bouchet and Arlin P. S. Crotts and John I. Danziger and Eli Dwek and Kevin France and Peter M. Garnavich and Stephen S. Lawrence and Bruno Leibundgut and Peter Lundqvist and Nino Panagia and Chun Shing Jason Pun and Nathan Smith and George Sonneborn and L. Wang and J. Craig Wheeler},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2011},
  volume={474},
  pages={484-486}
}
When a massive star explodes as a supernova, substantial amounts of radioactive elements—primarily 56Ni, 57Ni and 44Ti—are produced. After the initial flash of light from shock heating, the fading light emitted by the supernova is due to the decay of these elements. However, after decades, the energy powering a supernova remnant comes from the shock interaction between the ejecta and the surrounding medium. The transition to this phase has hitherto not been observed: supernovae occur too… 

The Remnant of Supernova 1987A

Although it has faded by a factor of ∼107, SN 1987A is still bright enough to be observed in almost every band of the electromagnetic spectrum. Today, the bolometric luminosity of the debris is

Hard-X-ray emission lines from the decay of 44Ti in the remnant of supernova 1987A

Observations of hard X-rays from the remnant of supernova 1987A in the narrow band containing two direct-escape lines of 44Ti imply that this decay provided sufficient energy to power the remnant at late times, which is near the upper bound of theoretical predictions.

Dust Production and Particle Acceleration in Supernova 1987A Revealed with ALMA

Supernova (SN) explosions are crucial engines driving the evolution of galaxies by shock heating gas, increasing the metallicity, creating dust, and accelerating energetic particles. In 2012 we used

THE MORPHOLOGY OF THE EJECTA IN SUPERNOVA 1987A: A STUDY OVER TIME AND WAVELENGTH

We present a study of the morphology of the ejecta in Supernova 1987A based on images and spectra from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) as well as integral field spectroscopy from VLT/SINFONI. The

LATE SPECTRAL EVOLUTION OF THE EJECTA AND REVERSE SHOCK IN SN 1987A

We present observations with the Very Large Telescope and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) of the broad emission lines from the inner ejecta and reverse shock of SN 1987A from 1999 February until 2012

44Ti gamma-ray emission lines from SN1987A reveal an asymmetric explosion

Observations of supernova 1987A (SN1987A) have resolved the 67.87- and 78.32–kilo–electron volt emission lines from decay of 44Ti produced in the supernova explosion, direct evidence of large-scale asymmetry in the explosion.

Dust in Supernovae and Supernova Remnants II: Processing and Survival

Observations have recently shown that supernovae are efficient dust factories, as predicted for a long time by theoretical models. The rapid evolution of their stellar progenitors combined with their

The Matter Beyond the Ring: The Recent Evolution of SN 1987A Observed by the Hubble Space Telescope

The nearby SN 1987A offers a spatially resolved view of the evolution of a young supernova (SN) remnant. Here we present recent Hubble Space Telescope imaging observations of SN 1987A, which we use

THREE-DIMENSIONAL DISTRIBUTION OF EJECTA IN SUPERNOVA 1987A AT 10,000 DAYS

Due to its proximity, SN 1987A offers a unique opportunity to directly observe the geometry of a stellar explosion as it unfolds. Here we present spectral and imaging observations of SN 1987A

Very Deep inside the SN 1987A Core Ejecta: Molecular Structures Seen in 3D

Most massive stars end their lives in core-collapse supernova explosions and enrich the interstellar medium with explosively nucleosynthesized elements. Following core collapse, the explosion is
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References

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Time evolution of the line emission from the inner circumstellar ring of SN 1987A and its hot spots

Supernovae are some of the most energetic phenomena in the Universe and they have throughout history fascinated people as they appeared as new stars in the sky. Supernova (SN) 1987A exploded in the

Far-infrared observations of thermal dust emission from supernova 1987A

INFRARED observations of supernova 1987A are important for studying both the evolution of the ejecta and its interaction with the surrounding interstellar medium. Here we report observtions of

Hard emission at late times from SN 1987A

A model for the explosion that has been successful in predicting and explaining the evolution of SN 1987A during its first one and one-half years is used to calculate the future photometric evolution

The 44Ti-powered spectrum of SN 1987A

SN 1987A provides a unique opportunity to study the evolution of a supernova from explosion into very late phases. Owing to the rich chemical structure, the multitude of physical processes involved

The Axisymmetric Ejecta of Supernova 1987A

Extensive early observations proved that the ejecta of supernova 1987A (SN 1987A) are aspherical. The most important of these early observations include (1) the "Bochum event" that revealed

Observing Supernova 1987A with the Refurbished Hubble Space Telescope

Observations with the Hubble Space Telescope, conducted since 1990, now offer an unprecedented glimpse into fast astrophysical shocks in the young remnant of supernova 1987A, and it is found that the Lyα and Hα lines from shock emission continue to brighten, whereas their maximum velocities continue to decrease.

The 3-D structure of SN 1987A's inner ejecta

Context. Observing the inner ejecta of a supernova is possible only in a handful of nearby supernova remnants. The core-collapse explosion mechanism has been extensively explored in recent models and

The Reverse Shock of SNR 1987A at 18 Years after Outburst

We use low-dispersion spectra obtained at the Magellan Observatory to study the broad Hα emission from the reverse shock of the infant supernova remnant SNR 1987A. These spectra demonstrate that the

MULTIFREQUENCY RADIO MEASUREMENTS OF SUPERNOVA 1987A OVER 22 YEARS

We present extensive observations of the radio emission from the remnant of supernova (SN) 1987A made with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA), since the first detection of the remnant in

Evolution of the Reverse Shock Emission from SNR 1987A

We present new (2004 July) G750L and G140L Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) data of the Hα and Lyα emission from supernova remnant (SNR) 1987A. With the aid of earlier data, from 1997