X-Ray and Radio Observations of the Magnetar SGR J1935+2154 during Its 2014, 2015, and 2016 Outbursts

@article{Younes2017XRayAR,
  title={X-Ray and Radio Observations of the Magnetar SGR J1935+2154 during Its 2014, 2015, and 2016 Outbursts},
  author={George Younes and Chryssa Kouveliotou and Amruta D. Jaodand and Matthew G. Baring and Alexander J. van der Horst and Alice K. Harding and Jason W. T. Hessels and N. C. Gehrels and Ramandeep Gill and Daniela Huppenkothen and Jonathan Granot and Ersin G{\"o}ğ{\"u}ş and Lin Lin},
  journal={The Astrophysical Journal},
  year={2017},
  volume={847}
}
We analyzed broadband X-ray and radio data of the magnetar SGR J1935+2154 taken in the aftermath of its 2014, 2015, and 2016 outbursts. The source soft X-ray spectrum <10 keV is well described with a blackbody+power-law (BB+PL) or 2BB model during all three outbursts. Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array observations revealed a hard X-ray tail, with a PL photon index Γ = 0.9, extending up to 50 keV, with flux comparable to the one detected <10 keV. Imaging analysis of Chandra data did not… 
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