Worldwide patterns of genomic variation and admixture in gray wolves.

@article{Fan2016WorldwidePO,
  title={Worldwide patterns of genomic variation and admixture in gray wolves.},
  author={Zhenxin Fan and Pedro Silva and Ilan Gronau and Shuoguo Wang and Aitor Serres Armero and Rena M. Schweizer and Oscar Ram{\'i}rez and John P. Pollinger and Marco Galaverni and Diego Ortega Del-Vecchyo and Lianming Du and Wenping Zhang and Zhihe Zhang and Jinchuan Xing and Carles Vil{\`a} and Tom{\'a}s Marqu{\`e}s-Bonet and Raquel Godinho and Bisong Yue and Robert K. Wayne},
  journal={Genome research},
  year={2016},
  volume={26 2},
  pages={
          163-73
        }
}
The gray wolf (Canis lupus) is a widely distributed top predator and ancestor of the domestic dog. To address questions about wolf relationships to each other and dogs, we assembled and analyzed a data set of 34 canine genomes. The divergence between New and Old World wolves is the earliest branching event and is followed by the divergence of Old World wolves and dogs, confirming that the dog was domesticated in the Old World. However, no single wolf population is more closely related to dogs… 

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