Corpus ID: 142625519

World and Variation: The Reproduction and Consumption of Narrative

@article{Eiji2010WorldAV,
  title={World and Variation: The Reproduction and Consumption of Narrative},
  author={Ōtsuka Marc Eiji and Ōtsuka Marc Steinberg},
  journal={Mechademia},
  year={2010},
  volume={5},
  pages={116 - 99}
}
It would not be an overstatement to suggest that Ōtsuka Eiji is one of the most important writers on anime and manga subcultures in Japan. He has also been one of the most important writers on fan cultures. If the intersection of subcultures and fan cultures is so marked in Japan, it is at least in part because the term subukaruchaa in Japan has a different valence than the English term “subculture” as deployed in Anglo-American cultural studies, where it carries the sense of an oppositional… 
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