Corpus ID: 149959403

Working for Families: The Impact on Child Poverty

@article{Perry2004WorkingFF,
  title={Working for Families: The Impact on Child Poverty},
  author={B. Perry},
  journal={Social Policy Journal of New Zealand},
  year={2004},
  pages={19}
}
  • B. Perry
  • Published 2004
  • Psychology
  • Social Policy Journal of New Zealand
The Working for Families (WFF) benefit reform package was the centrepiece of the 2004 Budget announcements of the Labour-led coalition government in New Zealand. The package is targeted at low-to-middleincome families with dependent children. One of its core goals is to improve income adequacy for these families as one of the key means of reducing child poverty over the next three years. In this regard, it is an example of the government implementing many of the poverty alleviation strategies… Expand
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