Worker reproduction in honey-bees (Apis) and the anarchic syndrome: a review

@article{Barron2001WorkerRI,
  title={Worker reproduction in honey-bees (Apis) and the anarchic syndrome: a review},
  author={A. Barron and B. Oldroyd and F. Ratnieks},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
  year={2001},
  volume={50},
  pages={199-208}
}
Abstract. Honey-bees, Apis, are an important model system for investigating the evolution and maintenance of worker sterility. The queen is the main reproductive in a colony. Workers cannot mate, but they can lay unfertilized eggs, which develop into males if reared. Worker reproduction, while common in queenless colonies, is rare in queenright colonies, despite the fact that workers are more related to their own sons than to those of the queen. Evidence that worker sterility is enforced by… Expand

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