Worker reproduction and policing in insect societies: an ESS analysis

@article{Wenseleers2004WorkerRA,
  title={Worker reproduction and policing in insect societies: an ESS analysis},
  author={T. Wenseleers and H. Helanter{\"a} and A. Hart and F. Ratnieks},
  journal={Journal of Evolutionary Biology},
  year={2004},
  volume={17}
}
Insect societies are vulnerable to exploitation by workers who reproduce selfishly rather than help to rear the queen's offspring. In most species, however, only a small proportion of the workers reproduce. Here, we develop an evolutionarily stable strategy (ESS) model to investigate factors that could explain these observed low levels of reproductive exploitation. Two key factors are identified: relatedness and policing. Relatedness affects the ESS proportion of reproductive workers because… Expand
Comparative Analysis of Worker Reproduction and Policing in Eusocial Hymenoptera Supports Relatedness Theory
TLDR
This analysis provides strong overall support for the theory that relatedness affects kin conflict over male parentage and shows that a significantly higher percentage of the males are workers’ sons in species where the workers are more related to other workers' sons. Expand
Egg Policing and Fertility Signaling Across Colony Development in the Ant Camponotus floridanus
TLDR
The results show that mechanisms of social regulation, such as the response to fertility signals, change dramatically over a colony’s life cycle, and emphasize the importance of factors besides relatedness in predicting the level of conflict within a colony. Expand
REPRODUCTIVE CONFLICT IN SOCIAL INSECTS: MALE PRODUCTION BY WORKERS IN A SLAVE‐MAKING ANT.
TLDR
The results show that workers produce up to 100% of the males of the slave‐making ant Polyergus rufescens, the first direct evidence of an almost complete takeover of male reproduction by workers in ants. Expand
Lack of physical policing and fertility cues in egg-laying workers of the ant Camponotus floridanus
TLDR
Large colonies and low worker reproductive potential were accompanied by a lack of physical worker policing in C. floridanus workers, as predicted, and costs of worker reproduction were found and discussed. Expand
A TEST OF WORKER POLICING THEORY IN AN ADVANCED EUSOCIAL WASP, VESPULA RUFA
TLDR
It is shown that the yellowjacket Vespula rufa is characterized by low mating frequency, and that a significant percentage of the males are workers' sons, which supports theoretical predictions for paternities below 2, and contrasts with other Vespinae wasps, in which paternITIES are higher and few or no adult males are worker produced, probably due to worker policing. Expand
A TEST OF WORKER POLICING THEORY IN AN ADVANCED EUSOCIAL WASP, VESPULA RUFA
TLDR
It is shown that the yellowjacket Vespula rufa is characterized by low mating frequency, and that a significant percentage of the males are workers' sons, which supports theoretical predictions for paternities below 2, and contrasts with other Vespinae wasps, in which paternITIES are higher and few or no adult males are worker produced, probably due to worker policing. Expand
“Selfish worker policing” controls reproduction in a Temnothorax ant
TLDR
A particular kind of reproduction control in the ant Temnothorax unifasciatus is reported, which can be considered as a selfish act itself, and reproduction appears to be controlled mostly through a few attacks from high-ranking workers, which, in this way, might attempt to selfishly increase their chances of future reproduction. Expand
Evolution of worker policing.
TLDR
It is found that the relatedness-based argument is not robust with respect to small changes in colony efficiency caused by policing, and precise conditions for the invasion and stability of policing alleles are derived. Expand
Policing of reproduction by hidden threats in a cooperative mammal
TLDR
The field experiment on wild banded mongooses shows that selection to evade the threat of infanticide by older, socially dominant females can explain the evolution of remarkable birth synchrony in this species, and shows that reproduction in animal societies can be profoundly influenced by threats that remain hidden until they are triggered experimentally. Expand
Worker self-restraint and policing maintain the queen’s reproductive monopoly in a pseudomyrmecine ant
TLDR
This study broadens the knowledge about reproductive conflict in social Hymenoptera and shows that worker sterility in the presence of a queen is more common in monogynous, monandrous ants than expected from relatedness alone. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 129 REFERENCES
WORKER POLICING IN THE HONEY BEE : BASIC FACTS AND IDEAS
Hymenopteran societies are non-clonal. As a result, there is potential conflict among individuals or groups of individuals over reproduction. One area of conflict is male production. In most eusocialExpand
Worker policing without genetic conflicts in a clonal ant
TLDR
It is shown that worker policing by aggressive attacks against additionally reproducing workers keeps the number of reproducing Workers low, and through experimental manipulation of thenumber of brood items per colony, it is shownthat worker policing can enhance group efficiency. Expand
Convergent evolution of worker policing by egg eating in the honeybee and common wasp
  • K. Foster, F. Ratnieks
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences
  • 2001
TLDR
Worker policing in V.vulgaris may be selected due to the colony–level benefit of conflict suppression, and genetic analysis revealed that workers are equally related to the queen's and other workers' sons. Expand
Worker policing in the European hornet Vespa crabro
TLDR
The presence of worker policing in queenright hornet colonies provides a proximate explanation for the absence of worker reproduction and may have been selected for because it enhances colony productivity by eliminating costly conflicts over reproduction. Expand
The Effect of Sex‐Allocation Biasing on the Evolution of Worker Policing in Hymenopteran Societies
TLDR
An inclusive‐fitness model is developed to show that a second reproductive conflict, the conflict over sex allocation, can explain the evolution of worker policing contrary to relatedness predictions. Expand
Worker policing limits the number of reproductives in a ponerine ant
TLDR
This work investigated worker policing in the ponerine ant Harpegnathos saltator in which workers are able to mate and replace the founding queen and appears to function primarily in preventing an excess of reproductive workers. Expand
Worker policing in the honeybee
TLDR
Experiments showing strong discrimination by honeybee (Apis mellifera) workers against worker-laid male eggs are described, supporting the worker-policing hypothesis. Expand
Reproductive Harmony via Mutual Policing by Workers in Eusocial Hymenoptera
TLDR
Examination of the cause-effect relationship between queen mating frequency and worker policing indicates that worker policing is caused by queen polyandry but thatworker policing is unlikely to cause polyandries, although it may help stabilize it if police workers show behavioral dominance. Expand
Worker policing in the bee Apis florea
TLDR
It is suggested that worker policing via oophagy of worker-laid eggs is pleisiomorphic for the genus A. florea, suggesting that worker sterility in this species is maintained by mutual policing mechanisms that keep worker reproduction at an extremely low level. Expand
Policing in queenless ponerine ants
TLDR
This work reviews worker and "queen" policing in queenless ponerine ants and extends the definition of policing to include species, such as queenless ants, where females are totipotent, thereby including not only conflict over male production but also over gamergate replacement and gamergate number. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...