Worker policing in the honeybee

@article{Ratnieks1989WorkerPI,
  title={Worker policing in the honeybee},
  author={Francis L. W. Ratnieks and P. Kirk Visscher},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1989},
  volume={342},
  pages={796-797}
}
IN most species of social Hymenoptera with queen–worker dimorphism, workers cannot mate but retain functional ovaries1; because males arise from unfertilized haploid eggs, workers can potentially produce males. Worker-derived males are frequent in some species, but in others occur only in queenless colonies2,3. Workers are more related to their own sons (coefficient of 0.5) than to the queen's sons (their brothers; 0.25); they are also more related to nephews (0.375) than brothers if queens… Expand
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