Worker Reproduction in the Higher Eusocial Hymenoptera

@article{Bourke1988WorkerRI,
  title={Worker Reproduction in the Higher Eusocial Hymenoptera},
  author={Andrew F. G. Bourke},
  journal={The Quarterly Review of Biology},
  year={1988},
  volume={63},
  pages={291 - 311}
}
  • A. Bourke
  • Published 1 September 1988
  • Biology
  • The Quarterly Review of Biology
Worker reproduction (i.e., the parthenogenetic production by workers of males and, more rarely, females) is very widespread in the higher eusocial Hymenoptera (bumble bees, stinglees bees, honey bees, vespine wasps, higher ants). Examples are given in the text. The mutualistic theory ("hopeful reproductive" hypothesis) of hymenopteran eusociality (semisocial route) states that the first workers were reproductive because the possibility of future reproduction was the condition for their… 
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It is shown that in natural colonies of the Saxon wasp, Dolichovespula saxonica, queens emit reliable chemical cues of their true fertility and that these putative queen signals decrease as the colony develops and worker reproduction increases, arguing against fast evolution of signals.
Male production by workers in the polygynous ant Prolasius advenus
TLDR
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