Work, welfare, and wellbeing: the impacts of welfare conditionality on people with mental health impairments in the UK

@article{Dwyer2020WorkWA,
  title={Work, welfare, and wellbeing: the impacts of welfare conditionality on people with mental health impairments in the UK},
  author={Peter J. Dwyer and L. Scullion and K. Jones and J. McNeill and A. Stewart},
  journal={Social Policy \& Administration},
  year={2020},
  volume={54},
  pages={311-326}
}
The personal, economic, and social costs of mental ill health are increasingly acknowledged by many governments and international organisations. Simultaneously, in high‐income nations, the reach of welfare conditionality has extended to encompass many people with mental health impairments as part of on‐going welfare reforms. This is particularly the case in the UK where, especially since the introduction of Employment and Support Allowance in 2008, the rights and responsibilities of disabled… Expand

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