Woody-tissue respiration for Simarouba amara and Minquartia guianensis, two tropical wet forest trees with different growth habits

@article{Ryan2004WoodytissueRF,
  title={Woody-tissue respiration for Simarouba amara and Minquartia guianensis, two tropical wet forest trees with different growth habits},
  author={Michael G. Ryan and Robert M. Hubbard and Deborah A. Clark and Robert L. Sanford},
  journal={Oecologia},
  year={2004},
  volume={100},
  pages={213-220}
}
We measured CO2 efflux from stems of two tropical wet forest trees, both found in the canopy, but with very different growth habits. The species were Simarouba amara, a fast-growing species associated with gaps in old-growth forest and abundant in secondary forest, and Minquartia guianensis, a slow-growing species tolerant of low-light conditions in old-growth forest. Per unit of bole surface, CO2 efflux averaged 1.24 μmol m−2 s−1 for Simarouba and 0.83 μmol m−2s−1 for Minquartia. CO2 efflux… 

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The fraction of annual net daytime carbon fixation used for stem maintenance respiration increased linearly with the average annual temperature of the site, and that of aboveground woody tissues of these conifers consumes 52–162 g C m−2 y−1 annually.

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