Women in the biological sciences : a biobibliographic sourcebook

@article{Schmid1999WomenIT,
  title={Women in the biological sciences : a biobibliographic sourcebook},
  author={Rudolf Schmid and Louise S. Grinstein and Carol A. Biermann and Rose K. Rose},
  journal={Taxon},
  year={1999},
  volume={48},
  pages={861}
}
Foreword by Martha Chiscon Preface Elizabeth Cabot Cary Agassiz (1822-1907) by Marilyn Bailey Ogilvie Hattie Elizabeth Alexander (1901-1968) by Soraya Svoronos Agnes Robertson Arber (1879-1960) by Maura C. Flannery Charlotte Auerbach (1899- ) by Linda E. Roach and Scott S. Roach Florence Augusta Merriam Bailey (1863-1948) by Harriet Kofalk Rachel Littler Bodley (1831-1888) by Ronald L. Stuckey Emma Lucy Braun (1889-1971) by Ronald L. Stuckey Elizabeth Gertrude Knight Britton (1858-1934) by Lee… 
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