Women's perceptions of their general health, with special reference to their risk of coronary artery disease: results of a national telephone survey.

@article{Legato1997WomensPO,
  title={Women's perceptions of their general health, with special reference to their risk of coronary artery disease: results of a national telephone survey.},
  author={M. Legato and E. Padus and E. Slaughter},
  journal={Journal of women's health},
  year={1997},
  volume={6 2},
  pages={
          189-98
        }
}
Previous studies have found that both patients and physicians have misconceptions about women's risk of coronary artery disease (CAD). We conducted telephone interviews with a representative sample of 1002 American women, focusing on women's knowledge of their risk of heart disease, women's preventive health behaviors, and what preventive testing is being done by women's physicians. Seventy-four percent of all surveyed women rated themselves as fairly or very knowledgeable about women's health… Expand
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