Women's Reproductive Cancers in Evolutionary Context

@article{Eaton1994WomensRC,
  title={Women's Reproductive Cancers in Evolutionary Context},
  author={Stanley Boyd Eaton and Malcolm C. Pike and Roger Valentine Short and Nancy C. Lee and James Trussell and Robert Anthony Hatcher and James W. Wood and Carol M Worthman and Melvin J. Konner and Kim Hill and Robert Bailey and Ana Magdalena Hurtado},
  journal={The Quarterly Review of Biology},
  year={1994},
  volume={69},
  pages={353 - 367}
}
Reproductive experiences for women in today's affluent Western nations differ from those of women in hunting and gathering societies, who continue the ancestral human pattern. These differences parallel commonly accepted reproductive risk factors for cancers of the breast, endometrium and ovary. Nutritional practices, exercise requirements, and body composition are nonreproductive influences that have been proposed as additional factors affecting the incidence of women's cancers. In each case… Expand

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