Wolf (Canis lupus Linnaeus, 1758) domestication: why did it occur so late and at such high latitude? A hypothesis

@article{Schnitzler2017WolfL,
  title={Wolf (Canis lupus Linnaeus, 1758) domestication: why did it occur so late and at such high latitude? A hypothesis},
  author={A. Schnitzler and M. Patou-Mathis},
  journal={Anthropozoologica},
  year={2017},
  volume={52},
  pages={149 - 153}
}
  • A. Schnitzler, M. Patou-Mathis
  • Published 2017
  • Geography
  • Anthropozoologica
  • ABSTRACT Wolf (Canis lupus Linnaeus, 1758) domestication has been the subject of many studies the last decades. All agree to consider that the dog (Canis familiaris Linnaeus, 1758) is the product of wolf domestication, and that this process occurred in Eurasia. Many divergences remain however on the geographic origin(s) of the process, whether domestication was a single event or multiple independent events, the earliest occurrences (roughly between 37 000 and 15 000 cal years ago), and the… CONTINUE READING

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