Wolbachia-induced incompatibility precedes other hybrid incompatibilities in Nasonia

@article{Bordenstein2001WolbachiainducedIP,
  title={Wolbachia-induced incompatibility precedes other hybrid incompatibilities in Nasonia},
  author={Seth R. Bordenstein and F. Patrick O’Hara and John H. Werren},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2001},
  volume={409},
  pages={707-710}
}
Wolbachia are cytoplasmically inherited bacteria that cause a number of reproductive alterations in insects, including cytoplasmic incompatibility, an incompatibility between sperm and egg that results in loss of sperm chromosomes following fertilization. Wolbachia are estimated to infect 15–20% of all insect species, and also are common in arachnids, isopods and nematodes. Therefore, Wolbachia-induced cytoplasmic incompatibility could be an important factor promoting rapid speciation in… Expand
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