Wiskott–Aldrich Syndrome Protein, a Novel Effector for the GTPase CDC42Hs, Is Implicated in Actin Polymerization

@article{Symons1996WiskottAldrichSP,
  title={Wiskott–Aldrich Syndrome Protein, a Novel Effector for the GTPase CDC42Hs, Is Implicated in Actin Polymerization},
  author={Marc Symons and Jonathan M. J. Derry and Brian Karlak and Sharon Jiang and Vanessa Lemahieu and Frank McCormick and Uta Francke and Arie Abo},
  journal={Cell},
  year={1996},
  volume={84},
  pages={723-734}
}

Figures from this paper

Cdc42-interacting Protein 4 Mediates Binding of the Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Protein to Microtubules*
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Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Protein Induces Actin Clustering without Direct Binding to Cdc42*
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WIP, a protein associated with wiskott-aldrich syndrome protein, induces actin polymerization and redistribution in lymphoid cells.
TLDR
It is suggested that WIP plays a role in cortical actin assembly that may be important for lymphocyte function and is identified using the yeast two-hybrid system.
Structure of Cdc42 in complex with the GTPase-binding domain of the ‘Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome’ protein
TLDR
Structural and biochemical data suggest that GBD-sequence divergence outside the CRIB motif may reflect additional regulatory interactions with functional domains that are specific to individual effectors.
Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein regulates podosomes in primary human macrophages.
TLDR
It is found that WASp colocalizes with CDC42Hs and actin in the core of podosomes, a highly dynamic adhesion structure of human blood-derived macrophages, which indicates that Wasp controls podosome assembly and, in cooperation with CDC 42Hs,Podosome disassembly in primary human macrophage.
The pleckstrin homology domain of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein is involved in the organization of actin cytoskeleton.
TLDR
Overexpression of WASP with a missense mutation in the N-terminus of the PH domain failed to induce the large cluster formation in COS-7 cells even in the presence of FCS, and it is suggested that the binding of PIP(2) to thePH domain is necessary for WASP to function properly.
Cdc42, Rac1, and the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein are involved in the cytoskeletal regulation of B lymphocytes.
TLDR
Evidence is provided for the involvement of Cdc42, Rac1, and WASP in the cytoskeletal regulation of B lymphocytes in the immunodeficiency disorder Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome.
Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein, WASP.
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