Wise deliberation sustains cooperation

@article{Grossmann2017WiseDS,
  title={Wise deliberation sustains cooperation},
  author={Igor Grossmann and Justin Peter Brienza and D. Ramona Bobocel},
  journal={Nature Human Behaviour},
  year={2017},
  volume={1}
}
Humans are intuitively cooperative1. Humans are also capable of deliberation, which includes social comparison2, self-reflection3 and mental simulation of the future4. Does deliberation undermine or sustain cooperation? Some studies suggest that deliberation is positively associated with cooperation5, whereas other work indicates that deliberation (vis-à-vis intuition) impairs cooperation in social dilemmas6,7. Do some aspects of reasoning qualify whether deliberation sustains cooperation or… 

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