Wise Choices, Apt Feelings: A Theory of Normative Judgment , Allan Gibbard. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1990, x + 346 pages.

@article{Green1991WiseCA,
  title={Wise Choices, Apt Feelings: A Theory of Normative Judgment , Allan Gibbard. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1990, x + 346 pages.},
  author={Edward J. Green},
  journal={Economics and Philosophy},
  year={1991},
  volume={7},
  pages={289 - 295}
}
  • E. Green
  • Published 1 October 1991
  • Psychology
  • Economics and Philosophy
Wise Choices, Apt Feelings is a far-ranging book. Primarily, though, it has to do with topics in the area common to analytic philosophy of mind and moral philosophy. Although the book is also a sustained examination of what is the meaning of rationality, it is not directly about the sort of substantive analysis of issues in the economic analysis of rational choice for which Allan Gibbard is well known among economists. In fact, Gibbard argues that such substantive analysis is not the best way… 
2 Citations
Ends and Persons: A Transcendental Argument
It has been a long-standing aim of analytic ethics to provide a formal deduction of our moral obligations from non-moral premises. Nagel (1971), Korsgaard (1996), and Parfit (1987) have all contended
Food Labels, Genetic Information, and the Right Not to Know
  • M. Loi
  • Medicine
    Kennedy Institute of Ethics journal
  • 2014
TLDR
Any policy to promote healthy diets through “judgmental” food labels, such as traffic light labels, or, hypothetically, scary pictures similar to those found in cigarette packets, ought to protect the individual right not to know.