Wired to the Workplace: The Relationship Between Electronic Connectedness to Work and Nurse Manager Satisfaction.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE The aim of this study is to describe the beliefs and behaviors of nurse leaders regarding electronic connectedness with their workplace and workplace support. BACKGROUND Electronic communication enables leaders' continuous availability to the workplace. This may blur home-work boundaries and contribute to burnout. METHODS This mixed-methods study surveyed nurses in 6 acute care hospitals in north Texas. A qualitative phase employed focus groups composed of nurses from participating hospitals to validate and enrich data collected in the quantitative phase. RESULTS Data showed that leader support directly influenced work-related electronic communication by influencing expectations regarding connectedness. Furthermore, leaders who frequently thought of leaving employment reported significantly lower levels of supervisor support and stronger beliefs that work interfered with home life than other respondents did. Focus group data supported survey findings. CONCLUSIONS Electronic availability of nurse leaders did not directly affect satisfaction, but supervisor support and perception that work interferes with home life strongly and directly affected satisfaction.

Cite this paper

@article{Gardner2017WiredTT, title={Wired to the Workplace: The Relationship Between Electronic Connectedness to Work and Nurse Manager Satisfaction.}, author={Candace Gardner and Amy Hailey and Christi Nguyen and Charlsea Prichard and Patricia Newcomb}, journal={The Journal of nursing administration}, year={2017}, volume={47 1}, pages={16-23} }