Winning by a Neck: Sexual Selection in the Evolution of Giraffe

@article{Simmons1996WinningBA,
  title={Winning by a Neck: Sexual Selection in the Evolution of Giraffe},
  author={Robert E. Simmons and Lue Scheepers},
  journal={The American Naturalist},
  year={1996},
  volume={148},
  pages={771 - 786}
}
A classic example of extreme morphological adaptation to the environment is the neck of the giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis), a trait that most biologists since Darwin have attributed to competition with other mammalian browsers. However, in searching for present-day evidence for the maintenance of the long neck, we find that during the dry season (when feeding competition should be most intense) giraffe generally feed from low shrubs, not tall trees; females spend over 50% of their time… 
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