Winners, losers, and posers: The effect of power poses on testosterone and risk-taking following competition

@article{Smith2017WinnersLA,
  title={Winners, losers, and posers: The effect of power poses on testosterone and risk-taking following competition},
  author={Kristopher M. Smith and Coren L. Apicella},
  journal={Hormones and Behavior},
  year={2017},
  volume={92},
  pages={172-181}
}
Abstract A contribution to a special issue on Hormones and Human Competition. The effect of postural power displays (i.e. power poses) on hormone levels and decision‐making has recently been challenged. While Carney et al. (2010) found that holding brief postural displays of power leads to increased testosterone, decreased cortisol and greater economic risk taking, this failed to replicate in a recent high‐powered study (Ranehill et al. 2015). It has been put forward that subtle differences in… Expand
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