Wind Selection and Drift Compensation Optimize Migratory Pathways in a High-Flying Moth

@article{Chapman2008WindSA,
  title={Wind Selection and Drift Compensation Optimize Migratory Pathways in a High-Flying Moth},
  author={Jason W. Chapman and Don R. Reynolds and Henrik Mouritsen and Jane K. Hill and Joseph R. Riley and Duncan Sivell and Alan D. Smith and Ian P. Woiwod},
  journal={Current Biology},
  year={2008},
  volume={18},
  pages={514-518}
}

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