Williamsonia carolinensis sp. nov. and Associated Eoginkgoites Foliage from the Upper Triassic Pekin Formation, North Carolina: Implications for Early Evolution in the Williamsoniaceae (Bennettitales)

@article{Pott2015WilliamsoniaCS,
  title={Williamsonia carolinensis sp. nov. and Associated Eoginkgoites Foliage from the Upper Triassic Pekin Formation, North Carolina: Implications for Early Evolution in the Williamsoniaceae (Bennettitales)},
  author={Christiane Pott and Brian J. Axsmith},
  journal={International Journal of Plant Sciences},
  year={2015},
  volume={176},
  pages={174 - 185}
}
  • C. Pott, B. Axsmith
  • Published 2 January 2015
  • Environmental Science
  • International Journal of Plant Sciences
Premise of research. Few reproductive organs unequivocally attributable to the important but enigmatic Mesozoic seed plant order Bennettitales have been described from the Triassic of all of North America outside of Greenland. Here, the first ovulate reproductive organs (gynoecia) of the group from the Upper Triassic of eastern North America are described and assigned to a proposed new species, Williamsonia carolinensis, of the family Williamsoniaceae. Methodology. The excellently preserved… 

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Williamsonia nizhonia sp. nov., the first undoubted bennettitalean flower known from the Chinle Formation of Upper Triassic age in the south - western United States, is described in detail. The

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