William Thomson – father of thermogeology

@inproceedings{Banks2014WilliamT,
  title={William Thomson – father of thermogeology},
  author={David Banks},
  year={2014}
}
  • D. Banks
  • Published 20 November 2014
  • Geology
William Thomson was among the first scientists to try to understand thermogeology: the flow and storage of heat in the Earth. His interest in the field can be regarded as one of the fruits of a life-long love affair with the ‘mathematical poem’ of Joseph Fourier, which Thomson applied to a wide range of physical problems. For his inaugural lecture at Glasgow University, Thomson somewhat randomly selected terrestrial heat flow as an example to illustrate Fourier’s mathematics. Nevertheless… 

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