William McDougall, 1871 - 1938

@article{Greenwood1940WilliamM1,
  title={William McDougall, 1871 - 1938},
  author={Major Greenwood and May Smith},
  journal={Obituary Notices of Fellows of the Royal Society},
  year={1940},
  volume={3},
  pages={39 - 62}
}
William McDougall, son of Isaac Shimwell McDougall, a manufacturing chemist of Higher Broughton, and his wife Rebekah née Smalley, was born at Chadderton, Lancs, on 22 June 1871, and died November, 1938. McDougall described his father as a typical dark Highlander and his mother as of pure Saxon type. He represented, he said, “that blend of the Mediterranean and Nordic races which has produced the English people”. He was sent at the early age of five to a private school and at fourteen to Weimar… 

WILLIAM MCDOUGALL, AMERICAN PSYCHOLOGIST: A RECONSIDERATION OF NATURE-NURTURE DEBATES IN THE INTERWAR UNITED STATES.

  • A. Rose
  • Psychology
    Journal of the history of the behavioral sciences
  • 2016
TLDR
It is argued that rising American curiosity about inborn appetites-an interest rooted in earlier pragmatic philosophy and empirically investigated by interwar scientists-explains McDougall's migration to the United States and his growing success there.

Tackling Shell Shock in Great War Oxford: Thomas Saxty Good, William McDougall, and James Arthur Hadfield

  • J. Stewart
  • Medicine, Philosophy
    Canadian bulletin of medical history = Bulletin canadien d'histoire de la medecine
  • 2016
TLDR
It is argued that a close examination of the practices of three Oxford physicians reveals a curious combination of therapeutic pragmatism and psychoanalytically informed techniques that later helped inform clinical psychology's challenge to psychiatry’s dominance over the concept and care of mental disorder.

The Hebb Synapse Before Hebb: Theories of Synaptic Function in Learning and Memory Before , With a Discussion of the Long-Lost Synaptic Theory of William McDougall

TLDR
An overview of some of the theories of the neural basis of learning and memory before Hebb are given and the synaptic theory of William McDougall is described, which appears to have been an idea ahead of its time; so far behind its time that it was completely ignored by his contemporaries.