William Cookesley, William Hunter and the first patient to survive removal of the appendix in 1731 – A case history with 31 years’ follow up

@article{Selley2016WilliamCW,
  title={William Cookesley, William Hunter and the first patient to survive removal of the appendix in 1731 – A case history with 31 years’ follow up},
  author={P. Selley},
  journal={Journal of Medical Biography},
  year={2016},
  volume={24},
  pages={180 - 183}
}
  • P. Selley
  • Published 2016
  • Medicine
  • Journal of Medical Biography
William Cookesley, a surgeon in Devon, England, successfully operated on a patient with an Amyand hernia in 1731, incidentally excising the appendix. His patient is the earliest documented to have survived appendicectomy. This was confirmed by a post mortem examination 31 years later. Part of the remaining bowel was preserved by William Hunter and this specimen remains in the Hunterian Museum in Glasgow. 

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  • Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London
October 8, 1735. Hanvil Anderson, a boy, 11 years of age, was admitted into St. George's hospital near Hyde-Park Corner, for the cure of a hernia scrotialis, which he had had from his infancy, and aExpand
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A considerable share of the intestines cut off after a mortification in a hernia and cured by Mr William Cookesley surgeon in Crediton