Willful modulation of brain activity in disorders of consciousness.

@article{Monti2010WillfulMO,
  title={Willful modulation of brain activity in disorders of consciousness.},
  author={Martin Max Monti and Audrey Vanhaudenhuyse and Martin R. Coleman and M{\'e}lanie Boly and John D. Pickard and Luaba Tshibanda and Adrian Mark Owen and Steven Laureys},
  journal={The New England journal of medicine},
  year={2010},
  volume={362 7},
  pages={
          579-89
        }
}
BACKGROUND The differential diagnosis of disorders of consciousness is challenging. The rate of misdiagnosis is approximately 40%, and new methods are required to complement bedside testing, particularly if the patient's capacity to show behavioral signs of awareness is diminished. METHODS At two major referral centers in Cambridge, United Kingdom, and Liege, Belgium, we performed a study involving 54 patients with disorders of consciousness. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI… 

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