Wild elephant (Loxodonta africana) breeding herds respond to artificially transmitted seismic stimuli

@article{OConnellRodwell2005WildE,
  title={Wild elephant (Loxodonta africana) breeding herds respond to artificially transmitted seismic stimuli},
  author={Caitlin E. O'Connell-Rodwell and Jason D Wood and Timothy C Rodwell and Sunil Puria and Sarah R. Partan and Rachael Louise Keefe and David Shriver and Byron T. Arnason and Lorinda A. Hart},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
  year={2005},
  volume={59},
  pages={842-850}
}
Seismic communication is known to be utilized in insects, amphibians, reptiles, and small mammals, but its use has not yet been documented in large mammals. Elephants produce low-frequency vocalizations, and these vocalizations have seismic components that propagate in the ground, but it has not yet been demonstrated that elephants can detect or interpret these seismic signals. In this study, we played back seismic replicates of elephant alarm vocalizations to herds of wild African elephants in… Expand

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