Wild Pollinators Enhance Fruit Set of Crops Regardless of Honey Bee Abundance

@article{Garibaldi2013WildPE,
  title={Wild Pollinators Enhance Fruit Set of Crops Regardless of Honey Bee Abundance},
  author={Lucas Alejandro Garibaldi and Ingolf Steffan‐Dewenter and Rachael Winfree and Marcelo Adri{\'a}n Aizen and Riccardo Bommarco and Saul A. Cunningham and Claire Kremen and Lu{\'i}sa Gigante Carvalheiro and Lawrence D. Harder and Ohad Afik and Ignasi Bartomeus and Faye E Benjamin and Virginie Boreux and Daniel P. Cariveau and Natacha Chacoff and Jan‐Hendrik Dudenh{\"o}ffer and Breno Magalh{\~a}es Freitas and Jaboury Ghazoul and Sarah S. Greenleaf and Juliana Hip{\'o}lito and Andrea Holzschuh and Brad G. Howlett and Rufus Isaacs and Steven K. Javorek and Christina M. Kennedy and Kristin Krewenka and Smitha Krishnan and Yael Mandelik and Margaret M. Mayfield and Iris Motzke and Theodore Mushambanyi Munyuli and Brian A. Nault and Mark Otieno and Jessica D. Petersen and Gideon Pisanty and Simon G. Potts and Romina Rader and Taylor H. Ricketts and Maj Rundl{\"o}f and Colleen L. Seymour and Christof Sch{\"u}epp and Hajnalka Szentgy{\"o}rgyi and Hisatomo Taki and Teja Tscharntke and Carlos H. Vergara and Blandina Felipe Viana and Thomas Cherico Wanger and Catrin Westphal and Neal M. Williams and Alexandra‐Maria Klein},
  journal={Science},
  year={2013},
  volume={339},
  pages={1608 - 1611}
}
Honeybees Can't Do It Alone The majority of food crops require pollination to set fruit with the honeybee providing a pollination workhorse, with both feral and managed populations an integral component of crop management (see the Perspective by Tylianakis, published online 28 February). Garibaldi et al. (p. 1608, published online 28 February) now show that wild pollinators are also a vital part of our crop systems. In more than 40 important crops grown worldwide, wild pollinators improved… 
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