Wikipedia and neurological disorders

@article{Brigo2015WikipediaAN,
  title={Wikipedia and neurological disorders},
  author={Francesco Brigo and Stanley C Igwe and Raffaele Nardone and Piergiorgio Lochner and Willem M. Otte},
  journal={Journal of Clinical Neuroscience},
  year={2015},
  volume={22},
  pages={1170-1172}
}
Our aim was to evaluate Wikipedia page visits in relation to the most common neurological disorders by determining which factors are related to peaks in Wikipedia searches for these conditions. Millions of people worldwide use the internet daily as a source of health information. Wikipedia is a popular free online encyclopedia used by patients and physicians to search for health-related information. The following Wikipedia articles were considered: Alzheimer's disease; Amyotrophic lateral… Expand
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