Wide-angle memories of close-up scenes.

@article{Intraub1989WideangleMO,
  title={Wide-angle memories of close-up scenes.},
  author={Helene Intraub and Matthew Theodore Richardson},
  journal={Journal of experimental psychology. Learning, memory, and cognition},
  year={1989},
  volume={15 2},
  pages={
          179-87
        }
}
  • H. Intraub, M. Richardson
  • Published 1989
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Journal of experimental psychology. Learning, memory, and cognition
We report a picture-memory phenomenon in which subjects' recall and recognition of photographed scenes reveal a pronounced extension of the pictures' boundaries. After viewing 20 pictures for 15 s each, 37 undergraduates exhibited this striking distortion; 95% of their drawings included information that had not been physically present but that would have been likely to have existed just outside the camera's field of view (Experiment 1). To determine if boundary extension is limited to recall… Expand

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