Why whales are big but not bigger: Physiological drivers and ecological limits in the age of ocean giants

@article{Goldbogen2019WhyWA,
  title={Why whales are big but not bigger: Physiological drivers and ecological limits in the age of ocean giants},
  author={Jeremy A. Goldbogen and David E. Cade and D M Wisniewska and Jean Potvin and Paolo S Segre and Matthew S. Savoca and Elliott L. Hazen and Max F. Czapanskiy and Shirel R Kahane-Rapport and Stacy L. DeRuiter and Shane Gero and Pernille T{\o}nnesen and William T. Gough and M Bradley Hanson and Marla M Holt and Frants Havmand Jensen and M. Simon and Alison K Stimpert and Patricia Arranz and David W. Johnston and Douglas P. Nowacek and Susan E. Parks and Fleur Visser and Ari S. Friedlaender and Peter Lloyd Tyack and Peter Teglberg Madsen and Nicholas D. Pyenson},
  journal={Science},
  year={2019},
  volume={366},
  pages={1367 - 1372}
}
It's the prey that matters Although many people think of dinosaurs as being the largest creatures to have lived on Earth, the true largest known animal is still here today—the blue whale. How whales were able to become so large has long been of interest. Goldbogen et al. used field-collected data on feeding and diving events across different types of whales to calculate rates of energy gain (see the Perspective by Williams). They found that increased body size facilitates increased prey capture… Expand

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