Why we mind sea turtles' underwater business: A review on the study of diving behavior

@article{Hochscheid2014WhyWM,
  title={Why we mind sea turtles' underwater business: A review on the study of diving behavior},
  author={Sandra Hochscheid},
  journal={Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology},
  year={2014},
  volume={450},
  pages={118-136}
}
  • S. Hochscheid
  • Published 2014
  • Biology
  • Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology
Abstract For most of their lifetime, sea turtles have to organize their underwater activities around the necessity to return to the surface to breathe. This group of animals has developed extraordinary diving capacities (over 10 h of single breath-hold dives and dive depths exceeding 1200 m) that allow them to exploit oceanic and neritic habitats, and maintain their role in marine ecosystems, despite the numerous threats imposed on them by human activities. Understanding sea turtle behavior… Expand
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